List of Researchers for Turn Testing Into Learning E-Course/BETA VERSION

Note to Brilliant readers: This list is meant to accompany the description of Turn Testing Into Learning e-course, here. The course’s coverage of Pretests draws on research by Lindsey Richland of the University of Chicago and Nate Kornell of Williams College. The course’s coverage of Micro-Tests draws on research by Karl Szpunar of the University of Illinois-Chicago and Daniel Schacter
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Turn Testing Into Learning E-Course/BETA VERSION

Note to Brilliant readers: I am trying something new! After writing a magazine article, I often feel that there’s so much more information I have left to share with my readers—often of the very practical, how-to sort that doesn’t make it into a magazine feature. I felt that way recently after writing an article for Scientific American about making testing
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When Kids Engage In “Making,” Are They Learning Anything?

 A note to Brilliant readers: The following essay appears in the May issue of School Library Journal. The issue is devoted to making and maker spaces, and includes many interesting articles on the subject—I encourage you to check it out. My own contribution looks at how librarians, teachers, and parents can make sure that kids are learning while they make
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Stupid Things People Do . . . And How Not To Do Them Yourself

Are you feeling tired today? Who isn’t? But common as it is, fatigue can become a serious professional liability, as an airline baggage handler discovered in dramatic fashion last week. Case Study No. 2 Who it is: A baggage handler for Alaska Airlines (his name has not been disclosed). What he did: While loading suitcases on an Alaska Airlines jet,
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Stupid Things People Do . . . And How Not To Do Them Yourself

What leads us to say the wrong thing at the wrong time? We’ve all done it — and then, mortified, wondered why we didn’t keep our mouths shut. A high-profile example from this past week provides an object lesson for all of us in the origin of such lapses. Case Study No. 1 Who it is: Andrew Harrison, University of
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The Brilliant Blog’s Most-Commented-On Posts of 2014

I got the nicest email from a reader last week. It read: “I was thinking this morning that I hadn’t read a newsletter from you in a while. I realized that—even though I have been super busy—there has been a bit of a mental vacuum with their absence. “I conducted a search to see if I had fallen off the
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Getting Closer to Brilliant

My dear brilliant readers, For the past three years, I’ve been researching and reporting and reflecting on what it is that makes people smart. The usual answers to that question concern long-range causes—genes, childhood rearing environment. I’m more interested in the short-range determinants of intelligence: the immediate conditions under which we learn and work, conditions that can prompt us to
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News of the World, At Every Level

“A man who traveled from Liberia to visit family members in Texas tested positive for Ebola on Tuesday, marking the outbreak’s first diagnosis outside of Africa, health officials said.” That’s a pretty standard lead-in for a news story, pitched at the level of a newspaper-reading adult. But it’s a long, rather complex sentence, and a younger reader would likely find
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Making Student Data Useful

One indisputable effect of introducing technology into education has been the generation of unprecedented amounts of electronic data on America’s public school students—their attendance, their test scores, their graduation rates, and many other kinds of information that can now be tracked and stored in massive databases. What to do with all this data is another question. The use of students’
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Relevance and Purpose = Engagement, Motivation, and Persistence

Why does this matter? Teachers are often called upon to answer this question about an academic subject, and computer science instructors may face this demand more frequently than most. Learning to write lines of code can seem, to many students, like a pointless exercise in tedium. But a few professors of computer science have a compelling reply at the ready.
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