Brilliant: The New Science of Smart

Learning is the master skill, the ability that allows us to realize our ambitions: succeeding in school, getting ahead at work, playing a sport or a musical instrument, speaking a second language. Yet until recently, even the experts didn’t understand how learning works. Now research in cognitive science, psychology and neuroscience is revealing the simple and surprising techniques that can help us learn to be smarter. Read all about it in Brilliant: The New Science of Smart, coming in 2013 from Crown.

More about this book →

Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives

What makes us the way we are? Some say it’s the genes we inherit at conception. Others are sure it’s the environment we experience in childhood. But could it be that many of our individual characteristics—our health, our intelligence, our temperaments—are influenced by the conditions we encountered before birth?

That’s the claim of an exciting and provocative field known as fetal origins. Over the past twenty years, scientists have been developing a radically new understanding of our very earliest experiences and how they exert lasting effects on us from infancy well into adulthood. Their research offers a bold new view of pregnancy as a crucial staging ground for our health, ability, and well-being throughout life.

More about this book →

The Cult of Personality

Millions of Americans take personality tests each year: to get a job, to pursue an education, to settle a legal dispute, to better understand themselves and others. But where did these tests come from, and what are they saying about us? In The Cult of Personality, award-winning psychology writer Annie Murphy Paul reveals the surprising and disturbing story behind the tests that claim to capture human nature.

Combining cutting-edge research, engaging reporting, and absorbing history, Paul uncovers the way these allegedly neutral instruments are in fact shaped by the agendas of industry and government. She documents the dangers of their intrusive questions, biased assumptions, and limiting labels. And she exposes the flawed theories and faulty methods that render their results unreliable and invalid. Personality tests, she contends, produce descriptions of people that are nothing like human beings as they actually are: complicated, contradictory, changeable across time and place.

More about this book →

Sign up for The Brilliant Report, a monthly newsletter full of the latest findings on how to learn smarter:

Close