Extended Mind Deep Dive

Learning how to use our extended minds

“Prospective memory”—the ability to remember to act on our intentions—declines with age. But older people can perform on a par with younger ones when they use their extended minds: that is, when they rely on the external environment to provide cues and reminders. This process is known as “cognitive offloading.” It involves moving the intentions …

Learning how to use our extended minds Continue Reading >

The importance of knowing what your teammates know

In today’s information-saturated workplace, there’s too much knowledge for any one person to keep tabs on. Yet all relevant knowledge must somehow be marshaled and applied in order to accomplish a complex task. The solution to this dilemma lies in creating what psychologists call a “transactive memory system,” in which each person on a team …

The importance of knowing what your teammates know Continue Reading >

The joy of letting go of our individuality

During this pandemic year, we’ve been living as individuals—isolated individuals, practicing personal responsibility, wearing our own masks, washing our own hands. We’ve done this for the good of the collective as well as to preserve our own health—but the “collective” has existed mostly as an abstract idea. What we haven’t experienced in a while is …

The joy of letting go of our individuality Continue Reading >

Paying attention, together, changes the way we think

Imagine a real-life mind meld, in which one brain communicates directly with another. New advances are making this possible—taking people “beyond the confines of their bodies, creating a sort of extended cognition,” writes Laura Sanders in Science News. She points to the research of neuroscientist Rajesh Rao of the University of Washington. In his lab, …

Paying attention, together, changes the way we think Continue Reading >

Scroll to Top